Historical Research - A.Our First Ancestors

A.Our First Ancestors

C2-8-The Story of Madeleine Matte  -  by claudematte|ALL

Madeleine Matte

Name: Madeleine (8.2-1, -1) Sexe : F •

Birth : 3 November 1688 in Dombourg, Quebec, Canada •

Baptism: St. Francis de Sales, Seugnery of Dombourg (Neuville), Quebec, Canada. •

Sponsor: Pierre Constantineau Godmother: Madeleine Faucher

Priest: J. Basset, priest

 Marriage: No

Death & Burial: 11 November 1688, Neuville, Quebec, Canada.

Father: Nicolas Matte (2.1, -1) 8 Dec. 1636 to Ste. Genevieve in Bray, Ar. Dieppe, Archbishop of Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France. Mary: 12 Oct. 1671, Quebec

• Mother: Mary Madeleine Auvray (1, 1, -1) b: 1652 in Saint-Vivien, Rouen, Normandy, France, married: 12 Oct. 1671.

Biography

She is the first child of Nicolas and Madeleine and the first Matte to die in the country. Childhood diseases were also very numerous: croup, typhoid, rubella, measles, scarlet fever and smallpox represented high risks of death among young children. Not all died but many carried the scars for the rest of their lives.

Before ultrasounds and epidurals, gynecologists and anesthetists, midwives prevailed in New France. At that time, their advice and their remedies, might come as a surprise today, were followed to the letter in the cottages.

The advice of Marie-Barbe St-Amour, who was treated like royalty, was superior to that of men when it came to childbirth.

"First, the midwife is better," she said. Because the woman who gives birth preserves very important virtues, including her modesty and purity. And, of course, her faithfulness to her husband is not put to the test.

In the weeks before the big day, Marie-Barbe’s remedies could relieve the biggest pain. "Pour pepper and chop an onion and place both in a saucer. Flip this saucer on the mother's belly and hold it in place with a rope. The mother had to stay in bed for 48 hours. This remedy was remarkably effective. Two days later the stomach pain was gone even though there might be pain elswhere in the body."

The day of the birth, assisted by the relieuse, Marie-Barbe rushes to the bedside of the mother-to-be to massage the lower back. She laid out a straw mattress and oilcloth in the kitchen and delivery could begin. To give strength to the mother and relax the cervix during labor, the midwife made her drink mulled wine.

If a baby arrived and was born with a birthmark which displeased the birth parents? No problem! Marie Barbe had the solution. "You rub the birthmark with the remains of childbirth for two days. Then you burn the afterbirth and the birthmark should go away,"she would say.

To protect the infant of fever and prevent the mother's milk to dry up, Marie Barbe advised to swaddle the baby in a blue canvas for a year. If the baby was premature, the midwife advised to use wool rather than canvas, but always blue of course.

New France was taking care of her new moms. They had a generous maternity leave that stretched on... nine days!

The mother was exempt from housework during this period and could sit throughout the mass. Also, she could escape her wifely duties for 40 days after giving birth.

There is no doubt that without these tips, the proportion of stillbirths (one out of four) in New France, would have been even higher. Midwife Marie-Barbe St-Amour was an important person during the early years of New France.

LE SOLEIL, STEVE DESCHÊNES

You have more information and images in PDF format

Capsule 2-8 Format:: 

- Madeleine Matte History

The capsules # 00 are information bearing the word Matte, the capsules # 0 are of general information used to complete the capsules identified # -1 (Charles) or # 1 (Nicolas and Madeleine) or # 2 (children) , etc., which correspond to lineages of Matte ancestors.

Madeleine Matte

Name: Madeleine (8.2-1, -1) Sexe : F •

Birth : 3 November 1688 in Dombourg, Quebec, Canada •

Baptism: St. Francis de Sales, Seugnery of Dombourg (Neuville), Quebec, Canada. •

Sponsor: Pierre Constantineau Godmother: Madeleine Faucher

Priest: J. Basset, priest

 Marriage: No

Death & Burial: 11 November 1688, Neuville, Quebec, Canada.

Father: Nicolas Matte (2.1, -1) 8 Dec. 1636 to Ste. Genevieve in Bray, Ar. Dieppe, Archbishop of Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France. Mary: 12 Oct. 1671, Quebec

• Mother: Mary Madeleine Auvray (1, 1, -1) b: 1652 in Saint-Vivien, Rouen, Normandy, France, married: 12 Oct. 1671.

Biography

She is the first child of Nicolas and Madeleine and the first Matte to die in the country. Childhood diseases were also very numerous: croup, typhoid, rubella, measles, scarlet fever and smallpox represented high risks of death among young children. Not all died but many carried the scars for the rest of their lives.

Before ultrasounds and epidurals, gynecologists and anesthetists, midwives prevailed in New France. At that time, their advice and their remedies, might come as a surprise today, were followed to the letter in the cottages.

The advice of Marie-Barbe St-Amour, who was treated like royalty, was superior to that of men when it came to childbirth.

"First, the midwife is better," she said. Because the woman who gives birth preserves very important virtues, including her modesty and purity. And, of course, her faithfulness to her husband is not put to the test.

In the weeks before the big day, Marie-Barbe’s remedies could relieve the biggest pain. "Pour pepper and chop an onion and place both in a saucer. Flip this saucer on the mother's belly and hold it in place with a rope. The mother had to stay in bed for 48 hours. This remedy was remarkably effective. Two days later the stomach pain was gone even though there might be pain elswhere in the body."

The day of the birth, assisted by the relieuse, Marie-Barbe rushes to the bedside of the mother-to-be to massage the lower back. She laid out a straw mattress and oilcloth in the kitchen and delivery could begin. To give strength to the mother and relax the cervix during labor, the midwife made her drink mulled wine.

If a baby arrived and was born with a birthmark which displeased the birth parents? No problem! Marie Barbe had the solution. "You rub the birthmark with the remains of childbirth for two days. Then you burn the afterbirth and the birthmark should go away,"she would say.

To protect the infant of fever and prevent the mother's milk to dry up, Marie Barbe advised to swaddle the baby in a blue canvas for a year. If the baby was premature, the midwife advised to use wool rather than canvas, but always blue of course.

New France was taking care of her new moms. They had a generous maternity leave that stretched on... nine days!

The mother was exempt from housework during this period and could sit throughout the mass. Also, she could escape her wifely duties for 40 days after giving birth.

There is no doubt that without these tips, the proportion of stillbirths (one out of four) in New France, would have been even higher. Midwife Marie-Barbe St-Amour was an important person during the early years of New France.

LE SOLEIL, STEVE DESCHÊNES

You have more information and images in PDF format

Capsule 2-8 Format:: 

- Madeleine Matte History

The capsules # 00 are information bearing the word Matte, the capsules # 0 are of general information used to complete the capsules identified # -1 (Charles) or # 1 (Nicolas and Madeleine) or # 2 (children) , etc., which correspond to lineages of Matte ancestors.

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