Historical Research - A.Our First Ancestors

A.Our First Ancestors

Capsule 1 -A - Madeleine Auvray (EN)  -  by claudematte|ALL

Madeleine Auvray

Born 23 décembre 1649 in the parish of Saint-Vivien, locality in the Archdiocese of Rouen, in the former Province of Normandy today the Seine-Maritime Department, where her parents,  Antoine Auvray and Marie Lenormand were from and were married on 22 August 1649. Madeleine has two sisters and a brother, also baptized in Rouen: Marguerite baptized in 1663, Marie, born October 30, 1654, whose godfather is Pierre Danet and the godmother Marie Cronier, and a brother, Claude, born February 2, 1651, whose godparents were Claude Reneault and Michelle Mariet.

The Church of St-Vivien already existed in the 12th century in the form of a chapel. It took its current appearance during the 14th and 15th century with its three naves without transept.

Arrived in 1671, Madeleine is the seventh Daughter of the King from this parish; she followed in Neuville :

  • Marie Lasnon dit Lainier in 1667 who marries first Pierre Ferret who will have 8 children in Neuville before the death of Pierre at the end of the year 1694, she lived 22 years in Neuville.

• Marie Lefebvre, arrived at the end of summer 1669, wife of Jean Delastre dit     Lajeunesse. The couple will be without descendants, she lived 24 years in Neuville.

• Marguerite Lamain, arrived in 1670, wife of Michel Rognon, soldier of the Carignan-Salieres regiment, with whom she will have six children, and then of Pierre Mercier with whom she will have eight children. She died in Neuville around 1715 after having lived in Neuville for 44 years. 

Three other girls from the same hometown, who arrived in 1667, will settle around Quebec City :

• Marie Bouet, wife of Martin Guerard dit Legras and Nicolas Groinier dit Métivier,

• Marie Michel, wife of Charles Morin,

• Catherine Vieillot, wife of Jacques Dubois then Pierre Guénet.

• According to Landry, 764 women embarked, mainly at the Port of Dieppe, then at La Rochelle to correct a significant deficit between the number of men and women in New France. In 1663, there are six men for a woman; in 1673, the last year of the sending of Daughters of the King, there are three men for a woman. Mostly from the region of France where at the time French speaking was the most widespread, the Daughters of the King contributed to the establishment of modern French in New France. In general, emigrants, who could be called francisants (38.4%), understood and spoke one or other of the French variants of Île-de-France or another important region. . Apart from the nobles, the clergy, the military officers, the administrators, and some great merchants, the French did not speak the "language of the king," but a popular French peppered with provincialisms and slang expressions.

The average age of immigrant women was 24 years old, the youngest being 14 years old (Marie-Claude Chamois, arrived in 1670 at the age of 14, married before 1674 with François Frigon, she returned to France in 1685), and the oldest, 59 years old (Marguerite Charpentier born around 1611, arrived in New France on July 3, 1668. She was buried in Montreal on September 27, 1694). In all, almost two-thirds of the King's Daughters were Orphans, either of father or mother - this is the case of Madeleine, who was orphaned by her father; his mother will die in 1725 in Rouen. Regardless of their origins, they come from very poor backgrounds

Undernourished, illiterate, orphaned, their first year of life did not augur well for the future. Selected as candidate for emigration, they faced a world of men waiting for companions.

Leaving Dieppe, in late June, on Le Prince Maurice, a 120 tons ship, under the command of Pierre Héraud, and after a stop at La Rochelle, 86 Filles du Roy, accompanied by Ms. Bourdon, in charge of recruitment and appointed by intendant Jean Talon, arrived at Quebec on 30 July 1671. 9 Filles du Roy from this boat, including Madeleine Auvray, will leave for Neuville. 

The brevity of dating reflects the pressure they experience upon arrival. Less than five months on average, for four cases out of ten, two months were sufficient. Only 50 girls were married during the first month, or 7.6%, 651 in the six first months, or 85.3% and 21 girls had to wait more than two years. The average time was 4.7 months between arrival and first marriage.

The Daughters of the King had a fertility rate a little lower than the Canadian women of the time (women born in the colony) according to the demographer Yves Landry, but higher than that of their compatriots in northwestern France; food conditions have favored their development; they have an average life expectancy of 41 years, thanks to the selection process and the more favorable living conditions.

Arrived at the end of July, Madeleine made a notarial contract on Saturday, October 10, a practice again above the average of the time, established by the notary Romain Becquet, and held several times in the house of Anne Gasnier, widow of Jean Bourdon, owner of the fief (seigniory) of Dombourg (today Neuville). Madeleine brings 300 pounds of property along with the royal dowry, according to the marriage contract. The spouses having communicated the day before, the widows tending to marry on Sundays. The average time was 4.7 months between arrival and the first marriage. The wedding takes place on Monday, October 12; the witnesses were Antoine Gentil, Étienne Léveillé and Jacques Fournel, of Rouen. The Jesuit Henri de Bernières, parish priest, officiates. Nine other couples were married at the same time, including Jacques Lussier, René Dumas dit Rencontre and Pierre Coquin dit Latournelle from Captain Grandfontaine's company. In most cases, urban women follow their husbands in rural areas.

On their concession of Neuville, conceded on March 20, 1667 to Nicolas by the Lord Jean Bourdon in front of the notary Gilles Rageot and transmitted to the couple on May 31, 1672, 11 children will be born there. Nicolas worked for Louis Blanchard at the 1667 census in Quebec City. He sold his land to intendant Jean Talon precisely in 1667. Leonard, the first child, died at the Hotel Dieu de Quebec at the age of 26 (capsule 2-1). Three boys will ensure the continuation of the name Matte: Laurent, the 3rd child, 1677-1712, Cap-Santé (capsule 2-3), Nicolas, the 5th child, 1682-1760, Neuville (capsule 2-5) and Alexis, the 9th child, 1692-1721 (capsule 2-9).

The six girls who got married had an offspring bearing the surname of their husbands:

• François Laroche and Marie-Françoise Matte (2nd child) had 12 children. They will stay in Neuville (capsule 2-2)

• Jacques Bourgoin and Marie Jeanne Matte (4th child), who died in January 1703, had only three children at St-Antoine de Tilly (capsule 2-4). In second marriage, Jacques Bourgoin marries Mr. Jeanne Mesny in 1706.

• Noël Pelletier and Madeleine (6th child) welcomed twelve children, ten of whom were married. Will stay in Neuville (capsule 2-6)

• Romain Dubuc and Marie-Anne (7th child) had two children, but Marie-Anne, widowed, married Étienne Magnan with whom she had eight other children and will live in Neuville (capsule 2-7)

• Jean-François Constantineau and Marie-Louise (10th child), in turn, had 11 children. Will move in the Seigneurie of Bay-Du-Febvre (capsule 2-10).

  • The last, Marie-Angelique (11th child), married Isaac Grenier; they lived in Sainte-Croix de Lotbiniere unlike all the others who cleared the lands of Neuville. They will have 7 children (capsule 2-11).
  • A Mary, the eighth (capsule 2-8) dies eight days after birth.

All the descendants who bear these names can claim like first ancestor mother the Daughter of the king,

Madeleine Auvray.

According to the Census of 1681, they have 15 acres of land either cleared or to be cleared, they receive seed and deliver their harvest. Madeleine has worked heavily on their land and they are owners of three heads of cattle. On January 26, 1695, they are unable to go to the wedding of their daughter, Marie-Françoise, their second child and first daughter because of the poor condition of the roads between Neuville and Québec.

The < Chemin du Roy > was built only as in 1737.

Madeleine dies on May 6, 1734, buried on the 7th, the celebrant being Dumont, doctor of theology and priest of Neuville, nearly 30 years after Nicolas, who died on July 20, 1704. Seven of his children died at his death.

It is interesting to note that Madeleine’s daughters married  Laroche, Bourgoin, Pelletier, Dubuc,

Magnan, Constantineau and Grenier men so that Madelaine Auvray is their ancestral mother

http://www.migrations.fr/ACTES_SEPULTURES_FillesROY/sepultures_filles_du_roy.htm

Nicolas and Madeleine’s land of two acres wide by forty acres deep on the St.Lawrence river had the former cadastre number two hundred forty, the 3506971  (at the bottom of the Highway 40 until the Canadian National Railway),

the 3506983  (at the bottom of the railway of the Canadian National to Highway 138)

and the 3506995 (bottom of route 138 to the St. Laurent River).

 Today on this earth is built the House bearing civic number 1348, Highway 138 and a part of the domains of the three mills vineyard.

This family pioneer and strain of Neuville is mentioned on the plate of the monument for the 300th located in the Park of the Hotel-de-Ville as one of the fifteen first families of Neuville              

She is also the godmother of Marie Françoise PELLETIER born on February 13th. 1711 in Neuville.

His father is Noël Pelletier and Marie-Madeleine Matte his 6th child. The godfather is Jean Hardy.

See capsule 2-6

The descendants of the following couples have all as parent ancestor Madeleine Auvray Daughter du Roy :

Bourgouin, Jacques and Marie-Jeanne Matte married in Neuville on November 3, 1695

Constantineau, François and Marie-Louise Matte married in Neuville on 5 November 1714

Dubuc, Romain and Marie-Anne Matte married to Neuville October 7, 1709

Dussault, Denis and M.-Madeleine Laroche married in Cap-Santé in 1725

Garnier ou Grenier Joseph and Marie-Angélique Matte married on St. Croix on October 3, 1717

Pelletier, Noël and Marie-Madeleine Matte married in Neuville on August 13, 1703

Laroche (Rochette, Rognon), François and M.-Louise Matte married in Neuville on 14 February 1695

Magnan, Étienne and Marie-Anne Matte married in Neuville on February 27, 1713

Pagé, François and M.-Marguerite Laroche married in Cap-Santé February 5, 1725

Perron, Pascal and M.-Louise Laroche married in Cap-Santé November 4, 1727

Brière, Joseph and M.-Jeanne Laroche married in Cap-Santé February 10, 1736

Brière, Louis and M.-Thérèse Laroche married in Cap-Santé November 27, 1741      

Several Auvray will be added in future years:

                      

Jacques Auvray was born on January 26, 1650 in France. Jacques is an immigrant arrived in 1680.
 

He married Marie-Catherine Martin, 16 January 1680 in l'ancienne Lorette, Quebec, Canada.

The couple had 6 children. Marie-Catherine Martin was born on 20 April 1664 in Quebec, Quebec, Canada. She died February 02, 1721 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, Canada (Royal Town).  His father is René said Mezeray and Nicole-Madeleine Gareman said.


Jacques Auvray died June 3, 1711 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, Canada (Royal Borough)

Children : Marie Auvray 1684 Lorette, Québec                 

                 Jacques Auvray 2/07/1687 Quebec- 1760    

  Thérèse Auvray 1690-1731
                 Catherine Auvray ca 1694-      

     Françoise Auvray b: 9 mai 1695 in Charlesbourg, Quebec d: vers 1738 in, Quebec      

    Marguerite Auvray b: 6 fév. 1703/04 in Charlesbourg, Quebec d: 4 fév. 1747/48 in Quebec
                Josephte Auvray b: 26 fév. 1706/07 in Charlesbourg, Quebec d: 14 mai 1758 in Quebec

Ainsi que :

Auvray, Anonyme b: 27 avril 1740 in Quebec, Quebec d: 27 Avril 1740 in Quebec, Quebec 

Auvray, Anonyme b: 7 oct. 1743 in Quebec, Quebec d: 7 oct. 1743 in Quebec, Quebec
Auvray, Francoise  b: arrive en 1705 de France 
Auvray, Jacques b: 1651 in St Saturnin, Tours, Touraine, France d: 4 Juin 1711 in Charlesbourg,

Auvray, Jacques b: 25 avril 1700 in Charlesbourg, Quebec 
Auvray, Jacques b: 6 mai 1741 in Quebec, Quebec d: 5 avril 1742 in Quebec, Quebec 
Auvray, Jacques Charles  b: 22 mars 1749/50 in Quebec, Quebec d: 1 Avril 1750 in Quebec,

Auvray, Jean Francois b: arrive vers 1751 à Quebec 
Auvray, Judith b: 1623 in France d: vers 1656 in France 
Auvray, Marguerite b: 20 décembre 1681 in Lorette, Quebec d: 23 déc. 1681 in Lorette, Quebec 
Auvray, Marie b: arrive en 1630 de France 
Auvray, Marie Angélique b: 28 mai 1737 in Quebec, Quebec 
Auvray, Marie Anne b: 16 fév. 1746/47 in Quebec, Quebec 
Auvray, Marie Catherine b: 30 juin 1736 in Quebec, Quebec d: 8 juillet 1736 in Quebec, Quebec 
Auvray, Marie Madeleine b: 18 déc. 1702 in Charlesbourg, Quebec d: 3 fév. 1702/03 in Charlesbourg,  
Auvray, Marie Thérèse b: 11 mars 1689/90 in Lorette, Quebec d: 10 mars 1730/31 in Charlesbourg,
Auvray, Noel b: arrive in 1630 in St Saturnin, Tours, Touraine, France 

You have more information and images in PDF format

Capsule 1-A (10 Pages) Format PDF: - Madeleine Auvray (EN)

The capsules # 00 are information bearing the word Matte, the capsules # 0 are of general information used to complete the capsules identified # -1 (Charles) or # 1 (Nicolas and Madeleine) or # 2 (children) , etc., which correspond to lineages of Matte ancestors.

Madeleine Auvray

Born 23 décembre 1649 in the parish of Saint-Vivien, locality in the Archdiocese of Rouen, in the former Province of Normandy today the Seine-Maritime Department, where her parents,  Antoine Auvray and Marie Lenormand were from and were married on 22 August 1649. Madeleine has two sisters and a brother, also baptized in Rouen: Marguerite baptized in 1663, Marie, born October 30, 1654, whose godfather is Pierre Danet and the godmother Marie Cronier, and a brother, Claude, born February 2, 1651, whose godparents were Claude Reneault and Michelle Mariet.

The Church of St-Vivien already existed in the 12th century in the form of a chapel. It took its current appearance during the 14th and 15th century with its three naves without transept.

Arrived in 1671, Madeleine is the seventh Daughter of the King from this parish; she followed in Neuville :

  • Marie Lasnon dit Lainier in 1667 who marries first Pierre Ferret who will have 8 children in Neuville before the death of Pierre at the end of the year 1694, she lived 22 years in Neuville.

• Marie Lefebvre, arrived at the end of summer 1669, wife of Jean Delastre dit     Lajeunesse. The couple will be without descendants, she lived 24 years in Neuville.

• Marguerite Lamain, arrived in 1670, wife of Michel Rognon, soldier of the Carignan-Salieres regiment, with whom she will have six children, and then of Pierre Mercier with whom she will have eight children. She died in Neuville around 1715 after having lived in Neuville for 44 years. 

Three other girls from the same hometown, who arrived in 1667, will settle around Quebec City :

• Marie Bouet, wife of Martin Guerard dit Legras and Nicolas Groinier dit Métivier,

• Marie Michel, wife of Charles Morin,

• Catherine Vieillot, wife of Jacques Dubois then Pierre Guénet.

• According to Landry, 764 women embarked, mainly at the Port of Dieppe, then at La Rochelle to correct a significant deficit between the number of men and women in New France. In 1663, there are six men for a woman; in 1673, the last year of the sending of Daughters of the King, there are three men for a woman. Mostly from the region of France where at the time French speaking was the most widespread, the Daughters of the King contributed to the establishment of modern French in New France. In general, emigrants, who could be called francisants (38.4%), understood and spoke one or other of the French variants of Île-de-France or another important region. . Apart from the nobles, the clergy, the military officers, the administrators, and some great merchants, the French did not speak the "language of the king," but a popular French peppered with provincialisms and slang expressions.

The average age of immigrant women was 24 years old, the youngest being 14 years old (Marie-Claude Chamois, arrived in 1670 at the age of 14, married before 1674 with François Frigon, she returned to France in 1685), and the oldest, 59 years old (Marguerite Charpentier born around 1611, arrived in New France on July 3, 1668. She was buried in Montreal on September 27, 1694). In all, almost two-thirds of the King's Daughters were Orphans, either of father or mother - this is the case of Madeleine, who was orphaned by her father; his mother will die in 1725 in Rouen. Regardless of their origins, they come from very poor backgrounds

Undernourished, illiterate, orphaned, their first year of life did not augur well for the future. Selected as candidate for emigration, they faced a world of men waiting for companions.

Leaving Dieppe, in late June, on Le Prince Maurice, a 120 tons ship, under the command of Pierre Héraud, and after a stop at La Rochelle, 86 Filles du Roy, accompanied by Ms. Bourdon, in charge of recruitment and appointed by intendant Jean Talon, arrived at Quebec on 30 July 1671. 9 Filles du Roy from this boat, including Madeleine Auvray, will leave for Neuville. 

The brevity of dating reflects the pressure they experience upon arrival. Less than five months on average, for four cases out of ten, two months were sufficient. Only 50 girls were married during the first month, or 7.6%, 651 in the six first months, or 85.3% and 21 girls had to wait more than two years. The average time was 4.7 months between arrival and first marriage.

The Daughters of the King had a fertility rate a little lower than the Canadian women of the time (women born in the colony) according to the demographer Yves Landry, but higher than that of their compatriots in northwestern France; food conditions have favored their development; they have an average life expectancy of 41 years, thanks to the selection process and the more favorable living conditions.

Arrived at the end of July, Madeleine made a notarial contract on Saturday, October 10, a practice again above the average of the time, established by the notary Romain Becquet, and held several times in the house of Anne Gasnier, widow of Jean Bourdon, owner of the fief (seigniory) of Dombourg (today Neuville). Madeleine brings 300 pounds of property along with the royal dowry, according to the marriage contract. The spouses having communicated the day before, the widows tending to marry on Sundays. The average time was 4.7 months between arrival and the first marriage. The wedding takes place on Monday, October 12; the witnesses were Antoine Gentil, Étienne Léveillé and Jacques Fournel, of Rouen. The Jesuit Henri de Bernières, parish priest, officiates. Nine other couples were married at the same time, including Jacques Lussier, René Dumas dit Rencontre and Pierre Coquin dit Latournelle from Captain Grandfontaine's company. In most cases, urban women follow their husbands in rural areas.

On their concession of Neuville, conceded on March 20, 1667 to Nicolas by the Lord Jean Bourdon in front of the notary Gilles Rageot and transmitted to the couple on May 31, 1672, 11 children will be born there. Nicolas worked for Louis Blanchard at the 1667 census in Quebec City. He sold his land to intendant Jean Talon precisely in 1667. Leonard, the first child, died at the Hotel Dieu de Quebec at the age of 26 (capsule 2-1). Three boys will ensure the continuation of the name Matte: Laurent, the 3rd child, 1677-1712, Cap-Santé (capsule 2-3), Nicolas, the 5th child, 1682-1760, Neuville (capsule 2-5) and Alexis, the 9th child, 1692-1721 (capsule 2-9).

The six girls who got married had an offspring bearing the surname of their husbands:

• François Laroche and Marie-Françoise Matte (2nd child) had 12 children. They will stay in Neuville (capsule 2-2)

• Jacques Bourgoin and Marie Jeanne Matte (4th child), who died in January 1703, had only three children at St-Antoine de Tilly (capsule 2-4). In second marriage, Jacques Bourgoin marries Mr. Jeanne Mesny in 1706.

• Noël Pelletier and Madeleine (6th child) welcomed twelve children, ten of whom were married. Will stay in Neuville (capsule 2-6)

• Romain Dubuc and Marie-Anne (7th child) had two children, but Marie-Anne, widowed, married Étienne Magnan with whom she had eight other children and will live in Neuville (capsule 2-7)

• Jean-François Constantineau and Marie-Louise (10th child), in turn, had 11 children. Will move in the Seigneurie of Bay-Du-Febvre (capsule 2-10).

  • The last, Marie-Angelique (11th child), married Isaac Grenier; they lived in Sainte-Croix de Lotbiniere unlike all the others who cleared the lands of Neuville. They will have 7 children (capsule 2-11).
  • A Mary, the eighth (capsule 2-8) dies eight days after birth.

All the descendants who bear these names can claim like first ancestor mother the Daughter of the king,

Madeleine Auvray.

According to the Census of 1681, they have 15 acres of land either cleared or to be cleared, they receive seed and deliver their harvest. Madeleine has worked heavily on their land and they are owners of three heads of cattle. On January 26, 1695, they are unable to go to the wedding of their daughter, Marie-Françoise, their second child and first daughter because of the poor condition of the roads between Neuville and Québec.

The < Chemin du Roy > was built only as in 1737.

Madeleine dies on May 6, 1734, buried on the 7th, the celebrant being Dumont, doctor of theology and priest of Neuville, nearly 30 years after Nicolas, who died on July 20, 1704. Seven of his children died at his death.

It is interesting to note that Madeleine’s daughters married  Laroche, Bourgoin, Pelletier, Dubuc,

Magnan, Constantineau and Grenier men so that Madelaine Auvray is their ancestral mother

http://www.migrations.fr/ACTES_SEPULTURES_FillesROY/sepultures_filles_du_roy.htm

Nicolas and Madeleine’s land of two acres wide by forty acres deep on the St.Lawrence river had the former cadastre number two hundred forty, the 3506971  (at the bottom of the Highway 40 until the Canadian National Railway),

the 3506983  (at the bottom of the railway of the Canadian National to Highway 138)

and the 3506995 (bottom of route 138 to the St. Laurent River).

 Today on this earth is built the House bearing civic number 1348, Highway 138 and a part of the domains of the three mills vineyard.

This family pioneer and strain of Neuville is mentioned on the plate of the monument for the 300th located in the Park of the Hotel-de-Ville as one of the fifteen first families of Neuville              

She is also the godmother of Marie Françoise PELLETIER born on February 13th. 1711 in Neuville.

His father is Noël Pelletier and Marie-Madeleine Matte his 6th child. The godfather is Jean Hardy.

See capsule 2-6

The descendants of the following couples have all as parent ancestor Madeleine Auvray Daughter du Roy :

Bourgouin, Jacques and Marie-Jeanne Matte married in Neuville on November 3, 1695

Constantineau, François and Marie-Louise Matte married in Neuville on 5 November 1714

Dubuc, Romain and Marie-Anne Matte married to Neuville October 7, 1709

Dussault, Denis and M.-Madeleine Laroche married in Cap-Santé in 1725

Garnier ou Grenier Joseph and Marie-Angélique Matte married on St. Croix on October 3, 1717

Pelletier, Noël and Marie-Madeleine Matte married in Neuville on August 13, 1703

Laroche (Rochette, Rognon), François and M.-Louise Matte married in Neuville on 14 February 1695

Magnan, Étienne and Marie-Anne Matte married in Neuville on February 27, 1713

Pagé, François and M.-Marguerite Laroche married in Cap-Santé February 5, 1725

Perron, Pascal and M.-Louise Laroche married in Cap-Santé November 4, 1727

Brière, Joseph and M.-Jeanne Laroche married in Cap-Santé February 10, 1736

Brière, Louis and M.-Thérèse Laroche married in Cap-Santé November 27, 1741      

Several Auvray will be added in future years:

                      

Jacques Auvray was born on January 26, 1650 in France. Jacques is an immigrant arrived in 1680.
 

He married Marie-Catherine Martin, 16 January 1680 in l'ancienne Lorette, Quebec, Canada.

The couple had 6 children. Marie-Catherine Martin was born on 20 April 1664 in Quebec, Quebec, Canada. She died February 02, 1721 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, Canada (Royal Town).  His father is René said Mezeray and Nicole-Madeleine Gareman said.


Jacques Auvray died June 3, 1711 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, Canada (Royal Borough)

Children : Marie Auvray 1684 Lorette, Québec                 

                 Jacques Auvray 2/07/1687 Quebec- 1760    

  Thérèse Auvray 1690-1731
                 Catherine Auvray ca 1694-      

     Françoise Auvray b: 9 mai 1695 in Charlesbourg, Quebec d: vers 1738 in, Quebec      

    Marguerite Auvray b: 6 fév. 1703/04 in Charlesbourg, Quebec d: 4 fév. 1747/48 in Quebec
                Josephte Auvray b: 26 fév. 1706/07 in Charlesbourg, Quebec d: 14 mai 1758 in Quebec

Ainsi que :

Auvray, Anonyme b: 27 avril 1740 in Quebec, Quebec d: 27 Avril 1740 in Quebec, Quebec 

Auvray, Anonyme b: 7 oct. 1743 in Quebec, Quebec d: 7 oct. 1743 in Quebec, Quebec
Auvray, Francoise  b: arrive en 1705 de France 
Auvray, Jacques b: 1651 in St Saturnin, Tours, Touraine, France d: 4 Juin 1711 in Charlesbourg,

Auvray, Jacques b: 25 avril 1700 in Charlesbourg, Quebec 
Auvray, Jacques b: 6 mai 1741 in Quebec, Quebec d: 5 avril 1742 in Quebec, Quebec 
Auvray, Jacques Charles  b: 22 mars 1749/50 in Quebec, Quebec d: 1 Avril 1750 in Quebec,

Auvray, Jean Francois b: arrive vers 1751 à Quebec 
Auvray, Judith b: 1623 in France d: vers 1656 in France 
Auvray, Marguerite b: 20 décembre 1681 in Lorette, Quebec d: 23 déc. 1681 in Lorette, Quebec 
Auvray, Marie b: arrive en 1630 de France 
Auvray, Marie Angélique b: 28 mai 1737 in Quebec, Quebec 
Auvray, Marie Anne b: 16 fév. 1746/47 in Quebec, Quebec 
Auvray, Marie Catherine b: 30 juin 1736 in Quebec, Quebec d: 8 juillet 1736 in Quebec, Quebec 
Auvray, Marie Madeleine b: 18 déc. 1702 in Charlesbourg, Quebec d: 3 fév. 1702/03 in Charlesbourg,  
Auvray, Marie Thérèse b: 11 mars 1689/90 in Lorette, Quebec d: 10 mars 1730/31 in Charlesbourg,
Auvray, Noel b: arrive in 1630 in St Saturnin, Tours, Touraine, France 

You have more information and images in PDF format

Capsule 1-A (10 Pages) Format PDF: - Madeleine Auvray (EN)

The capsules # 00 are information bearing the word Matte, the capsules # 0 are of general information used to complete the capsules identified # -1 (Charles) or # 1 (Nicolas and Madeleine) or # 2 (children) , etc., which correspond to lineages of Matte ancestors.

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