Historical Research - B.Places of Memory

B.Places of Memory

Capsule # 0-S - Cap-Sante(EN)  -  by claudematte|ALL

Cap-Sante

Cap-Santé is a city in Quebec (Canada), the capital of the Portneuf MRC, in the CapitaleNationale region. It is part of the Association of the most beautiful villages of Quebec, with an area of 55 square km. This town, which overlooks the St. Lawrence River on the north shore, is located on Chemin du Roy between Quebec City and Trois-Rivières, about 40 kilometers from Quebec City.

The name of Cap-Santé appeared for the first time in 1679, in the name of the parish of La Sainte-Famille-du-Cap-Santé. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain this unusual name. It seems, according to the Quebec toponymy Commission, that this name should be associated with the former French health or sanitation, which would therefore translate into sound healing. In fact, it's Cap de la Sente. Sente which, in Old French, means a side road. The natural channel of the St. Lawrence River flows south to north at Cap-Santé. The boats that went up the river had to cross from south to north by this path.

"This later became the municipality of the parish of Sainte-Famille (1855), then the municipality of Cap-Santé (1979) and finally the city of Cap-Santé (2000).

The current church was built between the years 1754-1773. The works were however interrupted during the Seven Years' War (1756-1763). It is one of the last churches erected under the French regime. The church reveals a unique architecture with its monumental facade decorated with three niches and two towers topped with steeples, an interior decoration made between 1859 and 1861 by the sculptor Raphael Giroux and master plasterer François Blouin and a trapezoidal altarpiece. It houses more paintings by Antoine Plamondon and Joseph Legare. This church was classified as a historic monument in 1986 by the Quebec Ministry of Cultural Affairs.

The presbytery, built in 1849 according to plans by architect Charles Baillargé with its dormant windows, is equally imposing. A cemetery surrounds the landscape that extends down to the St. Lawrence River.

In 1759, during the Seven Years' War, the Chevalier de Lévis built Fort Jacques-Cartier at this site, and it was from this fort that in 1760 Lévis attempted to retake Quebec. Today, there is not much left of this fort.

The city of Cap-Santé welcomed two famous people from Quebec's history: Mrs. Marie Fitzbach, the founder of the Congregation of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd lived in CapSanté in the 19th century, as well as Mr. Gérard Morisset, architect and historian art.

Cap-Santé will be the first corner of the region to be colonized by the Matte. Going up the trail (currently 365) and crossing the Jacques Cartier River at the Gué (today Déry bridge), they will decipher the lands of the rank now called Bois de L'Ail, nicknamed at the beginning of the 18th century, the rank Matte

Brief History of Cap-Santé

The territory of Cap-Santé, as it is currently known, is in fact made up of several lordships conceded in the 17th and 18th centuries. The largest part of its territory was essentially part of the seigneury of Portneuf, while the lands of the Grand Bois de l'Ail were attached to the Seigneurie Bélair des Écureuils. In addition, a large part of the seigniories of Auteuil and Bourg-Louis is within its limits.

The history of the municipality of Cap-Santé is therefore intrinsically linked to that of the Seigniory of Portneuf to which it is attached since the granting of the latter to Jacques Leneuf of the Pottery in 1636 (formalized in 1647). As we saw in the historical summary of Portneuf, the seigniorial domain is installed along the eastern shore of the Portneuf River and the settlements in this portion are only definitively started between the end of the 1660s and the beginning of the 1670s. The first residents of the eastern seigneury elect residence near the Cove of CapSanté from the years 1670-1680. Robert Germain and Mathurin Morisset are among these early settlers.

In 1679, the registers of the future parish of SainteFamille-du-Cap-Santé are opened with the baptism of Pierre Catalan celebrated in the chapel of the seigniorial domain. This birth is the first to be registered on the territory of the lordship of Portneuf. Between 1680 and 1709, the east of the lordship developed faster than the west and the sector of the seigniorial domain. Since the inhabitants are more numerous in the east, a new chapel-presbytery is built near the greatest human concentration, on land donated by Louis Motard, in the coast of Cap-Santé or Cape-de-laHoly family. Charles-JeanBaptiste Rageot-Morin, the first resident missionary, moved there. The adjoining cemetery hosts a first burial in 1711. By 1712, the lord Jean-Baptiste Toupin Du Sault, the lord of the Squirrels, had a flour mill built at the bottom of the Grand Bois de l'Ail which was part of his lordship. It is during this period that this portion of the territory begins to be developed.

The canonical erection of the parish of Sainte-Famille-du Cap-Santé took place in 1714. It was then a very large parish encompassing the seigneury of Portneuf and the seigneuries of Jacques-Cartier, Bélair, Auteuil, Neuville and BourgLouis. The religious authorities were quick to organize the new cure and gave it the following year a stone church with a steeply pitched roof covered with cedar shingles. Located north of the current church, the new temple has proportions reminiscent of those of the chapel of Cap-de-la-Madeleine, built at the same time. This new church will be known by the name of "the church of the Three Sisters" in memory of the young ladies of Petit de l'Angloiserie, daughters of the lord of Portneuf, who would have contributed financially to its erection.

Church, 1716. Source: Félix GATIEN, David GOSSELIN and J.-Albert FORTIER. History of Cap-Santé. 1955, p. 30. Built in 1716 demolished in 1775

The project to connect Montreal to Quebec by a dirt road hatched in 1706, but is concretized between 1731 and 1737. The arrival of the Roy Road in Cap-Santé is most likely accomplished during this period. Its narrow and irregular course runs along the river and connects the oldest houses of CapSanté which are erected in the first row facing the river. The path passes near the church of Cap-Santé to then climb the hill and go to join other lordships.

The second presbytery of the Sainte-Famille parish was built in 1734 and housed the priest of Cap-Santé until 1800. Around 1739, the Petit Bois de l'Ail, north of the village, welcomed its first inhabitants and developments are so well led that in 1743, eleven dealers claim their title. That same year, 45 tenants were listed in the first rank of the barony of Portneuf, compared to six in the concession Saint-Charles (municipality of Portneuf). The part of the Grand Bois de l'Ail located in Neuville is just beginning to develop.

These numerous developments mark the beginning of an intensive deforestation of the north of the seigneury, providing growers with a growing number of cultivable lands allowing the cultivation of wheat that will be in high demand until the first decades of the 19th century. Wheat becomes the first crop at Cap-Santé, well ahead of barley, peas and potatoes.

Some 577 inhabitants are scattered on the territory of the barony in 1749. The travelers who cross the sector, by way of water or road of earth, find among the inhabitants and the cabaretiers, a place of restoration and rest. If the majority of the population lives essentially from the culture of the land, some artisans and even a schoolmaster, live in the parish.

As soon as Father Fillion took office in the parish of Sainte-Famille in 1752, he noticed that the church was too small, poorly constructed and poorly positioned in relation to the land. For years, moreover, the building has been asking for continual repairs. The new priest is therefore busy building a new and large stone church whose work is undertaken in 1754. The construction site is delayed by the war against the English when the building materials of the church are requisitioned to allow the building Fort Jacques-Cartier. At the end of the conflict, the works resumed and ended in 1767

Eglise Cap-Santé and rectory built in 1799-1800 that looks a lot like the presbytery of Deschambault.

Source: Louise VOYER. Rectory of Cap-Santé, County of Portneuf. 1982, s.p.

Fort Jacques-Cartier, of which only a few archaeological remains remain, had been built at a strategic location, at the junction of the Jacques-Cartier River and the river, on a schist cape forming part of the parish of Cape Breton. Health. In 1759, following the capture of Quebec by the British, the French army temporarily withdrew until the capitulation of France. The house near the fort was occupied by the French army at the time.

The development of the Cap-Santé sector continues at the end of the 18th century. In 1789 began the colonization of the rank Saint-François, while in 1794, it is the turn of the rang Terrebonne to be divided and divided into concessions. In 1797, the establishment of a coast leading to the Cap-Santé strike facilitated trade in timber and trade. Two years later, a third presbytery replaces the previous structure that is recycled in the residents' room and meeting.

Until the Conquest, agriculture is predominant and the timber industry is still marginal. With the rise of this industry at the beginning of the 19th century, many sawmills settled on the territory. In the 1820s, the forest north and north-west of the parish was exploited to manufacture different pieces of wood exported to the markets of Quebec and international.

Gradually in the 19th century, artisans and traders became increasingly important in Cap-Santé. In 1831 there existed a tannery and a cooperage, at the bottom of the old coast, at the beginning of Anse. Several licensed pilots and members of the liberal professions make their home in the village. But the farmers, still dominant in the local economy, continue their advance in the north of the parish. Around 1814, the SaintGeorges rank was thus colonized.

New institutions are based on the territory of the current municipality of Cap-Santé including several schools, a first post office in 1832, a registry office in the 1840s, all integrated into the new parish municipality of Cape Town -Health created in 1845. A last presbytery is built in 1849 on the site of that of 1734, just next to that of 1799.

School of Jacques-Cartier. Source Post Office of CapSanté. Source: Madeleine BOURQUE et al. The life of Cap-Santé, souvenir book, 300th, 1679-1979. 1978, p. 117.

The second half of the 19th century is quite prosperous for Cap-Santé. The opening of new markets due to the growth of cities and the increase of the population allows the flow of agricultural and forestry production. With the intensification of animal husbandry and the dairy industry, creameries and dairies scattered around the parish become important for farmers who will sell and process their milk. A butter factory is built in 1888 on the coast of the Church.

In this context of excitement, the wharf of CapSanté is busy. It has a warehouse for food and is regularly visited by schooners as soon as the ice melts.

With the passage of Route 138 and the growing use of the car, many hotels and motels will appear everywhere along the national highway and will intensify tourism in Cap-Santé. More democratized this time, the tourism of the years 1930 to 1960 makes it possible to lodge the vacationers according to all the budgets. At CapSanté, we find the Cap-Santé Inn, the Grand Central, the Gray House, the Auberge of the Pound and the Manoir Cap-Santé. Auberde The pond.

Source BANQ

The church square is the central place for meeting and exchange. The great events of the city is held in this location, including the pontifical mass of 27 and 28 July 1924 

Already in the 19th century, Cap-Santé is recognized as a holiday resort. Highly prized by the bourgeoisie of Quebec City, some members of this class of privileged are built beautiful summer homes along the road King.

At the turn of the 20th century, the arrival of the Canadian National Railway, the importance of which will be superseded by trucking, the disappearance of ice bridges on the river following the opening of the seaway in winter, the relocation of commercial and industrial activities to major centers and the circumvention of automobile traffic on Highway 40 contribute to the slowdown in local economic development.

Some elements of the Cap-Santé built heritage With 63 buildings inventoried, the municipality of CapSanté is well represented in the inventory. The oldest houses in the center of the MRC de Portneuf have been identified. They are mainly concentrated along the old route of chemin du Roy (Route 138, Vieux Chemin, rue du Roy).

Manoir-Allsopp site including the house built around 1750.

The institutional core of Cap-Santé is particularly rich in heritage and very interesting at the visual level. The cemetery overlooking the river can be considered a real wooded park. The ensemble also includes the church of Sainte-Famille classified as a historic monument since the 1980s, a presbytery dating from 1849 designed according to the plans of the architect Charles Baillairgé, an old well, a monument of the Sacred Heart and a fountain in 1918.

The most interesting houses, but also the oldest, are located along the Old Road and the Rue du Roy. Although they incorporate an architectural diversity, the traditional Quebec house and the transition house largely dominate.

You have more information and images in PDF format

Capsule  # 0-S (20 pages) Format PDF:  - Cap-Sante(EN)

The capsules # 00 are information bearing the word Matte, the capsules # 0 are of general information used to complete the capsules identified # -1 (Charles) or # 1 (Nicolas and Madeleine) or # .2 (children) , etc., which correspond to lineages of Matte ancestors.

Cap-Sante

Cap-Santé is a city in Quebec (Canada), the capital of the Portneuf MRC, in the CapitaleNationale region. It is part of the Association of the most beautiful villages of Quebec, with an area of 55 square km. This town, which overlooks the St. Lawrence River on the north shore, is located on Chemin du Roy between Quebec City and Trois-Rivières, about 40 kilometers from Quebec City.

The name of Cap-Santé appeared for the first time in 1679, in the name of the parish of La Sainte-Famille-du-Cap-Santé. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain this unusual name. It seems, according to the Quebec toponymy Commission, that this name should be associated with the former French health or sanitation, which would therefore translate into sound healing. In fact, it's Cap de la Sente. Sente which, in Old French, means a side road. The natural channel of the St. Lawrence River flows south to north at Cap-Santé. The boats that went up the river had to cross from south to north by this path.

"This later became the municipality of the parish of Sainte-Famille (1855), then the municipality of Cap-Santé (1979) and finally the city of Cap-Santé (2000).

The current church was built between the years 1754-1773. The works were however interrupted during the Seven Years' War (1756-1763). It is one of the last churches erected under the French regime. The church reveals a unique architecture with its monumental facade decorated with three niches and two towers topped with steeples, an interior decoration made between 1859 and 1861 by the sculptor Raphael Giroux and master plasterer François Blouin and a trapezoidal altarpiece. It houses more paintings by Antoine Plamondon and Joseph Legare. This church was classified as a historic monument in 1986 by the Quebec Ministry of Cultural Affairs.

The presbytery, built in 1849 according to plans by architect Charles Baillargé with its dormant windows, is equally imposing. A cemetery surrounds the landscape that extends down to the St. Lawrence River.

In 1759, during the Seven Years' War, the Chevalier de Lévis built Fort Jacques-Cartier at this site, and it was from this fort that in 1760 Lévis attempted to retake Quebec. Today, there is not much left of this fort.

The city of Cap-Santé welcomed two famous people from Quebec's history: Mrs. Marie Fitzbach, the founder of the Congregation of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd lived in CapSanté in the 19th century, as well as Mr. Gérard Morisset, architect and historian art.

Cap-Santé will be the first corner of the region to be colonized by the Matte. Going up the trail (currently 365) and crossing the Jacques Cartier River at the Gué (today Déry bridge), they will decipher the lands of the rank now called Bois de L'Ail, nicknamed at the beginning of the 18th century, the rank Matte

Brief History of Cap-Santé

The territory of Cap-Santé, as it is currently known, is in fact made up of several lordships conceded in the 17th and 18th centuries. The largest part of its territory was essentially part of the seigneury of Portneuf, while the lands of the Grand Bois de l'Ail were attached to the Seigneurie Bélair des Écureuils. In addition, a large part of the seigniories of Auteuil and Bourg-Louis is within its limits.

The history of the municipality of Cap-Santé is therefore intrinsically linked to that of the Seigniory of Portneuf to which it is attached since the granting of the latter to Jacques Leneuf of the Pottery in 1636 (formalized in 1647). As we saw in the historical summary of Portneuf, the seigniorial domain is installed along the eastern shore of the Portneuf River and the settlements in this portion are only definitively started between the end of the 1660s and the beginning of the 1670s. The first residents of the eastern seigneury elect residence near the Cove of CapSanté from the years 1670-1680. Robert Germain and Mathurin Morisset are among these early settlers.

In 1679, the registers of the future parish of SainteFamille-du-Cap-Santé are opened with the baptism of Pierre Catalan celebrated in the chapel of the seigniorial domain. This birth is the first to be registered on the territory of the lordship of Portneuf. Between 1680 and 1709, the east of the lordship developed faster than the west and the sector of the seigniorial domain. Since the inhabitants are more numerous in the east, a new chapel-presbytery is built near the greatest human concentration, on land donated by Louis Motard, in the coast of Cap-Santé or Cape-de-laHoly family. Charles-JeanBaptiste Rageot-Morin, the first resident missionary, moved there. The adjoining cemetery hosts a first burial in 1711. By 1712, the lord Jean-Baptiste Toupin Du Sault, the lord of the Squirrels, had a flour mill built at the bottom of the Grand Bois de l'Ail which was part of his lordship. It is during this period that this portion of the territory begins to be developed.

The canonical erection of the parish of Sainte-Famille-du Cap-Santé took place in 1714. It was then a very large parish encompassing the seigneury of Portneuf and the seigneuries of Jacques-Cartier, Bélair, Auteuil, Neuville and BourgLouis. The religious authorities were quick to organize the new cure and gave it the following year a stone church with a steeply pitched roof covered with cedar shingles. Located north of the current church, the new temple has proportions reminiscent of those of the chapel of Cap-de-la-Madeleine, built at the same time. This new church will be known by the name of "the church of the Three Sisters" in memory of the young ladies of Petit de l'Angloiserie, daughters of the lord of Portneuf, who would have contributed financially to its erection.

Church, 1716. Source: Félix GATIEN, David GOSSELIN and J.-Albert FORTIER. History of Cap-Santé. 1955, p. 30. Built in 1716 demolished in 1775

The project to connect Montreal to Quebec by a dirt road hatched in 1706, but is concretized between 1731 and 1737. The arrival of the Roy Road in Cap-Santé is most likely accomplished during this period. Its narrow and irregular course runs along the river and connects the oldest houses of CapSanté which are erected in the first row facing the river. The path passes near the church of Cap-Santé to then climb the hill and go to join other lordships.

The second presbytery of the Sainte-Famille parish was built in 1734 and housed the priest of Cap-Santé until 1800. Around 1739, the Petit Bois de l'Ail, north of the village, welcomed its first inhabitants and developments are so well led that in 1743, eleven dealers claim their title. That same year, 45 tenants were listed in the first rank of the barony of Portneuf, compared to six in the concession Saint-Charles (municipality of Portneuf). The part of the Grand Bois de l'Ail located in Neuville is just beginning to develop.

These numerous developments mark the beginning of an intensive deforestation of the north of the seigneury, providing growers with a growing number of cultivable lands allowing the cultivation of wheat that will be in high demand until the first decades of the 19th century. Wheat becomes the first crop at Cap-Santé, well ahead of barley, peas and potatoes.

Some 577 inhabitants are scattered on the territory of the barony in 1749. The travelers who cross the sector, by way of water or road of earth, find among the inhabitants and the cabaretiers, a place of restoration and rest. If the majority of the population lives essentially from the culture of the land, some artisans and even a schoolmaster, live in the parish.

As soon as Father Fillion took office in the parish of Sainte-Famille in 1752, he noticed that the church was too small, poorly constructed and poorly positioned in relation to the land. For years, moreover, the building has been asking for continual repairs. The new priest is therefore busy building a new and large stone church whose work is undertaken in 1754. The construction site is delayed by the war against the English when the building materials of the church are requisitioned to allow the building Fort Jacques-Cartier. At the end of the conflict, the works resumed and ended in 1767

Eglise Cap-Santé and rectory built in 1799-1800 that looks a lot like the presbytery of Deschambault.

Source: Louise VOYER. Rectory of Cap-Santé, County of Portneuf. 1982, s.p.

Fort Jacques-Cartier, of which only a few archaeological remains remain, had been built at a strategic location, at the junction of the Jacques-Cartier River and the river, on a schist cape forming part of the parish of Cape Breton. Health. In 1759, following the capture of Quebec by the British, the French army temporarily withdrew until the capitulation of France. The house near the fort was occupied by the French army at the time.

The development of the Cap-Santé sector continues at the end of the 18th century. In 1789 began the colonization of the rank Saint-François, while in 1794, it is the turn of the rang Terrebonne to be divided and divided into concessions. In 1797, the establishment of a coast leading to the Cap-Santé strike facilitated trade in timber and trade. Two years later, a third presbytery replaces the previous structure that is recycled in the residents' room and meeting.

Until the Conquest, agriculture is predominant and the timber industry is still marginal. With the rise of this industry at the beginning of the 19th century, many sawmills settled on the territory. In the 1820s, the forest north and north-west of the parish was exploited to manufacture different pieces of wood exported to the markets of Quebec and international.

Gradually in the 19th century, artisans and traders became increasingly important in Cap-Santé. In 1831 there existed a tannery and a cooperage, at the bottom of the old coast, at the beginning of Anse. Several licensed pilots and members of the liberal professions make their home in the village. But the farmers, still dominant in the local economy, continue their advance in the north of the parish. Around 1814, the SaintGeorges rank was thus colonized.

New institutions are based on the territory of the current municipality of Cap-Santé including several schools, a first post office in 1832, a registry office in the 1840s, all integrated into the new parish municipality of Cape Town -Health created in 1845. A last presbytery is built in 1849 on the site of that of 1734, just next to that of 1799.

School of Jacques-Cartier. Source Post Office of CapSanté. Source: Madeleine BOURQUE et al. The life of Cap-Santé, souvenir book, 300th, 1679-1979. 1978, p. 117.

The second half of the 19th century is quite prosperous for Cap-Santé. The opening of new markets due to the growth of cities and the increase of the population allows the flow of agricultural and forestry production. With the intensification of animal husbandry and the dairy industry, creameries and dairies scattered around the parish become important for farmers who will sell and process their milk. A butter factory is built in 1888 on the coast of the Church.

In this context of excitement, the wharf of CapSanté is busy. It has a warehouse for food and is regularly visited by schooners as soon as the ice melts.

With the passage of Route 138 and the growing use of the car, many hotels and motels will appear everywhere along the national highway and will intensify tourism in Cap-Santé. More democratized this time, the tourism of the years 1930 to 1960 makes it possible to lodge the vacationers according to all the budgets. At CapSanté, we find the Cap-Santé Inn, the Grand Central, the Gray House, the Auberge of the Pound and the Manoir Cap-Santé. Auberde The pond.

Source BANQ

The church square is the central place for meeting and exchange. The great events of the city is held in this location, including the pontifical mass of 27 and 28 July 1924 

Already in the 19th century, Cap-Santé is recognized as a holiday resort. Highly prized by the bourgeoisie of Quebec City, some members of this class of privileged are built beautiful summer homes along the road King.

At the turn of the 20th century, the arrival of the Canadian National Railway, the importance of which will be superseded by trucking, the disappearance of ice bridges on the river following the opening of the seaway in winter, the relocation of commercial and industrial activities to major centers and the circumvention of automobile traffic on Highway 40 contribute to the slowdown in local economic development.

Some elements of the Cap-Santé built heritage With 63 buildings inventoried, the municipality of CapSanté is well represented in the inventory. The oldest houses in the center of the MRC de Portneuf have been identified. They are mainly concentrated along the old route of chemin du Roy (Route 138, Vieux Chemin, rue du Roy).

Manoir-Allsopp site including the house built around 1750.

The institutional core of Cap-Santé is particularly rich in heritage and very interesting at the visual level. The cemetery overlooking the river can be considered a real wooded park. The ensemble also includes the church of Sainte-Famille classified as a historic monument since the 1980s, a presbytery dating from 1849 designed according to the plans of the architect Charles Baillairgé, an old well, a monument of the Sacred Heart and a fountain in 1918.

The most interesting houses, but also the oldest, are located along the Old Road and the Rue du Roy. Although they incorporate an architectural diversity, the traditional Quebec house and the transition house largely dominate.

You have more information and images in PDF format

Capsule  # 0-S (20 pages) Format PDF:  - Cap-Sante(EN)

The capsules # 00 are information bearing the word Matte, the capsules # 0 are of general information used to complete the capsules identified # -1 (Charles) or # 1 (Nicolas and Madeleine) or # .2 (children) , etc., which correspond to lineages of Matte ancestors.

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Published on 2018/01/02 02:90   | All the posts | Preview   Print...   | Top
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Unfold Close A.Our First Ancestors

Unfold Close B.Places of Memory

Unfold Close C.The Local Branches of the Family

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Unfold Close E.Memorabilia and Curiosities

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