Historical Research - B.Places of Memory

B.Places of Memory

Capsule # 0-M - Deschambault  -  by claudematte|ALL

Deschambault

The village of Deschambault is in the western part of the County of Portneuf. It takes its origin from the seigneurie de Chavigny, granted in 1640 by the company of new France . In 1671, Jacques - Alexis Fleury, sieur Deschambault, married the heiress of the lordship and he became owner in 1683 by a land exchange . He then gives its name to his new domain. The Saint-Joseph-de-Deschambault parish was founded in 1713 and canonically erected in 1753. The municipality of parish was created in 1855, and the municipality of village split in 1951. These two entities are grouped again in 1989 . In 2002, two former villages of the north shore of the St. Lawrence River, between Quebec City and Trois-Rivières, merged to form the new municipality of Deschambault-Grondines. Once simple neighbors, two thousand residents of the merged villages become partners in the construction of Deschambault-Grondines, place of culture, home and memory

Along the St. Lawrence River over 20 kilometers, the territory of the municipality of Deschambault-Grondines represents an area of 125 square kilometers. This portion of the lowlands of the St. Lawrence is based on a large formation of sedimentary rock, a limestone also widely used in local constructions. River landscape marked by the seigneurial system and agriculture, the territory of the municipality contains traces of thousands of men and women who have lived and invested body and soul. It is permissible to believe that native Americans have frequented the area at the time Indian paleo, at the time where the Champlain Sea retreated, about 10,000 years ago. The earliest evidence of occupation of the portneuvois territory are however made by the excavations carried out at SaintAugustin. Most of the tools found there "are characteristic of the Laurentian archaic period called stretching between 1000 and 4000 BC. At Deschambault, Masson is faith of implantation of the St. Lawrence Iroquoians. According to the archaeologist José Benmouyal, this place would have occupied between 1450 and 1520 for a few years. This non-stockade village on a former marine terrace elevation of 30 meters above the sea level, included three or four longhouses and a smaller House. It would have housed 150 to 200 people. »

A FIRST VISITOR

¨The first European to set foot in Deschambault was Jacques Cartier, on his second voyage in 1535. September 19, ten days after his arrival at Stadacona, he went to Hochelaga aboard the swivel. At the height of the site of Deschambault, he was stopped by rapids and had to wait until high tide. Not far away was a village named Achelay whose chief made large home at Cartier. » 3

ANOTHER HOME OF CHAMPLAIN

June 24, 1603 (national feast of St. John-the-Baptist), Champlain was in Deschambault, 68 years after Cartier's visit. It was his first trip in the St. Lawrence Valley and he wasn't going to found Quebec City five years later. The country seduces him and he is particularly struck by the appearance of the river which he describes thus: «"This passage is very dangerous to go for quantity of rocks that are through the River, although it y aye good achenal which is strong tortu, where the River runs as a ras, and let's take the time about to pass. The Richelieu Rapids will be, until the mid-19th century, an important obstacle to navigation on the river. Summer 1633, after having taken possession of Quebec, occupied for three years by the English merchants, Champlain saw the possibility of creating new institutions in the colony. And it is precisely on the island, in the middle of the Rapids to which he gave the name of Richelieu, he installed the first post above Quebec. Very quickly, the Americans will come to Exchange furs. Champlain will fortify this place, because it allows to control passage on the river where circulate Iroquois Marauders

THE SEIGNEURIES

The seigneuries and Grondines Deschambault were granted at the same time by the company of the so-called Nouvelle-France Compagny des Cent-Associés. Map of Gedeon de Catalogne (part) in 1709 by Jean-Baptiste Decoüagne. In 1637, the Duchess of Aiguillon gets the promise a seigneurie to be granted to the nuns of the Hôtel-Dieu de Québec. This is fr. Jerome Lallemant, who will act on behalf of the nuns at the taking of possession of the seigneury "Of Grondines", signed in 1646 by Charles Huault de Montmagny, Governor and lieutenant General to the King of France. In 1672, the seigneury was enlarged eastward for the poor. The first confirmation will be celebrated by none other than Monseigneur de Laval in 1676. François de Chavigny, sieur de Berchereau, and bridesmaid Eléonore de Grandmaison, his widow wife Antoine Bourdier, are granted in 1640 a grant of a League and a half of land wide to take along the St. Lawrence River on three of depth. Their choice will stop on the land today in the east part of Deschambault. After the death of Mr de Chavigny in 1651, Éléonore de Grandmaison married Jacques de Gourdeau, sieur de Beaulieu, then after the latter's death, Jacques Cailhaut of the Tesserie de Lachevrotière. It is that, after the death of Mr de Lachevrotière it gets, in 1672, the enclaved land grant between the lordship of the poor of the Quebec hospital and the fief of Chandu.

ANCHORED IN HISTORY NAMES

The name Grondines is very old. It appears on a map of 1632. In 1712, in his report on the seigneuries, Gedeon de Catalogne explain this name by the "large number of flats of large pebbles which are escape, what makes that when it is windy, the waters are loud. For its part, Deschambault is named for Jacques - Alexis D'eschambault Fleury (1642-1715), husband of Marguerite de Chavigny. She was the daughter of François de Chavigny and Éléonore de Grandmaison, those who had obtained a concession in 1640.

BORN IN THE COUNTRY BUILDERS

The first settlers of Deschambault and Grondines come from families already established in Nouvelle-France, on the coast of Beaupré and the île Orleans. Although the land is granted in the middle of the 17th century, few of them will come to live permanently before 1670, because until then, the political climate favors little colonization; the Iroquois armed by the Dutch of Fort Orange (Albany, N.Y.) is too much threat. Josson, Hamelin, Masson, Leduc, Couillard, Tousignant, Mailhot, SaintAmant, Hudde, Chastenay, Salim will chose Grondines ; Arcand, Naud, Mayrand, Cloutier, Gauthier, Gariépy will move to La Chevrotière ; the Perost, Paquin, Groleau, Abel said Benoit and Montambault will be at Deschambault. In 1709, the engineer Gedeon de Catalogne are 35 families in Grondines, 22 La Chevrotière and 18 at Deschambault. In 1762, the three seigneuries are 663 souls.

A TERRITORY ORGANIZED

"The first occupation of the soil in Nouvelle-France was done by the intermediary of a territorial unit, a kind of neighborhood unit, which was called the coast and subsequently rank. Initially, the eastern waterfront and means arranged censives alignments perpendicular or almost to the shores of streams. When the banks were occupied, a second alignment was repeated behind the first, connected to it by a road called rise. A third, a fourth, a fifth alignment could follow in this order. […] This medium will be so organized physically by the parcel of row, socially by the parish and administratively the seigneury. »4 The administrative unit, now recognized as the municipality of Deschambault-Grondines comprises the first three rows of four Lordships, namely those of the nuns of the Hôtel-Dieu, the poor and La Chevrotière Chandu or Deschambault. Two parishes come together the inhabitants: Saint-Charles-des-Roches or Grondines, which registers were opened in 1680, and Saint-Josephde-Deschambault, whose records have been opened in 1713. If the parish today returns to the territory associated with the management of a Council, the fact remains that the Organization of the physical environment retains all traces of this pole whose center the Church and its bell towers. The administrative unit, now recognized as the municipality of Deschambault-Grondines comprises the first three rows of four Lordships, namely those of the nuns of the Hôtel-Dieu, the poor and La Chevrotière Chandu or Deschambault. Two parishes come together the inhabitants: Saint-Charles-des-Roches or Grondines, which registers were opened in 1680, and Saint-Joseph-de-Deschambault, whose records have been opened in 1713. If the parish today returns to the territory associated with the management of a Council, he fact remains that the Organization of the physical environment retains all traces of this pole whose center the Church and its bell towers.

A RICH RELIGIOUS HERITAGE

Religious heritage is ranked first among the witnesses of the establishment and rooting of Deschambault and Grondines communities. The legacy of the Catholic tradition is certainly concretely visible (churches, rectories, cemeteries, monasteries, cross road and wayside crosses), but it is also expressed through phenomena that are related to the intangible heritage. In this regard, efforts are being made for the transmission of certain traditions as midnight mass, sacred music and Gregorian chants. Religious communities devoted to education contributed greatly, not only in the education of children, but also to the cultural life of the villages with regard to literature, music, dramas, drawing and painting. The Sisters of charity of Quebec maintained their activities in Deschambault from 1861 to 1994 and the nuns of the Saint-Cœur-de-Marie to Grondines from 1944 to 1966. Religious heritage is ranked first among the witnesses of the establishment and rooting of Deschambault and Grondines communities. The legacy of the Catholic tradition is certainly concretely visible (churches, rectories, cemeteries, monasteries, cross road and wayside crosses), but it is also expressed through phenomena that are related to the intangible heritage. In this regard, efforts are being made for the transmission of certain traditions as midnight mass, sacred music and Gregorian chant. Religious communities devoted to education contributed greatly, not only in the education of children, but also to the cultural life of the villages with regard to literature, music, drama, drawing and painting. The Sisters of charity of Quebec maintained their activities in Deschambault from 1861 to 1994 and the nuns of the Saint-Cœur-de-Marie to Grondines from 1944 to 1966.

AN ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE RECOGNIZED

«In Portneuf, an air of family characterized architecture. Houses - including some of the oldest in Quebec - are made of limestone, a material abundant in the basement of this region, including Saint-Marc-des-Carrières and Neuville. Found at Deschambault, Cap-Santé and Neuville of many buildings of the 17th and 18th centuries on the walls mounted stone roughly squared, capped with sloping roofs, massed around very old places of Church, or arranged along the Chemin du Roy. These sets are unique. » 5 The recognition gained from the movement of backup and enhancement of heritage that still persist since the end of the 1980’s has tangible effects in the municipality: ten buildings are classified under the cultural property of the Quebec Act; protection areas attached to some of these buildings were allowed to maintain a consistency in the development of the territory; the Council of monuments and sites of Quebec adopted in 1982, a Charter of Quebec heritage conservation named Declaration of Deschambault; the municipality is part of the Association of the most beautiful villages of Quebec since the Foundation of this grouping in 1997; the older homes of Deschambault-Grondines are buyers passionate about heritage conservation each year, which contributes to the recognition of the municipality both for its architectural qualities as for the quality of life it offers its citizens.

1. Camille Lapointe, "Archaeology portneuvoise", continuity, summer 1991.

2. Camille Lapointe, "Archaeology portneuvoise", continuity, summer 1991.

3. Deschambault on over time, Editions VA Bene, 2002.

4. Jean-Claude Marsan, Habitat, architecture and culture in Quebec, encyclopedia of the Agora.

5. Yves Laframboise, picturesque Villages of Quebec, editions of man, 1996 June 2016 

You have more information and images in PDF format

Capsule # 0-M (10 pages) Format PDF: - Deschambault 

The capsules # 00 are information bearing the word Matte, the capsules # 0 are of general information used to complete the capsules identified # -1 (Charles) or # 1 (Nicolas and Madeleine) or # .2 (children) , etc., which correspond to lineages of Matte ancestors.

Deschambault

The village of Deschambault is in the western part of the County of Portneuf. It takes its origin from the seigneurie de Chavigny, granted in 1640 by the company of new France . In 1671, Jacques - Alexis Fleury, sieur Deschambault, married the heiress of the lordship and he became owner in 1683 by a land exchange . He then gives its name to his new domain. The Saint-Joseph-de-Deschambault parish was founded in 1713 and canonically erected in 1753. The municipality of parish was created in 1855, and the municipality of village split in 1951. These two entities are grouped again in 1989 . In 2002, two former villages of the north shore of the St. Lawrence River, between Quebec City and Trois-Rivières, merged to form the new municipality of Deschambault-Grondines. Once simple neighbors, two thousand residents of the merged villages become partners in the construction of Deschambault-Grondines, place of culture, home and memory

Along the St. Lawrence River over 20 kilometers, the territory of the municipality of Deschambault-Grondines represents an area of 125 square kilometers. This portion of the lowlands of the St. Lawrence is based on a large formation of sedimentary rock, a limestone also widely used in local constructions. River landscape marked by the seigneurial system and agriculture, the territory of the municipality contains traces of thousands of men and women who have lived and invested body and soul. It is permissible to believe that native Americans have frequented the area at the time Indian paleo, at the time where the Champlain Sea retreated, about 10,000 years ago. The earliest evidence of occupation of the portneuvois territory are however made by the excavations carried out at SaintAugustin. Most of the tools found there "are characteristic of the Laurentian archaic period called stretching between 1000 and 4000 BC. At Deschambault, Masson is faith of implantation of the St. Lawrence Iroquoians. According to the archaeologist José Benmouyal, this place would have occupied between 1450 and 1520 for a few years. This non-stockade village on a former marine terrace elevation of 30 meters above the sea level, included three or four longhouses and a smaller House. It would have housed 150 to 200 people. »

A FIRST VISITOR

¨The first European to set foot in Deschambault was Jacques Cartier, on his second voyage in 1535. September 19, ten days after his arrival at Stadacona, he went to Hochelaga aboard the swivel. At the height of the site of Deschambault, he was stopped by rapids and had to wait until high tide. Not far away was a village named Achelay whose chief made large home at Cartier. » 3

ANOTHER HOME OF CHAMPLAIN

June 24, 1603 (national feast of St. John-the-Baptist), Champlain was in Deschambault, 68 years after Cartier's visit. It was his first trip in the St. Lawrence Valley and he wasn't going to found Quebec City five years later. The country seduces him and he is particularly struck by the appearance of the river which he describes thus: «"This passage is very dangerous to go for quantity of rocks that are through the River, although it y aye good achenal which is strong tortu, where the River runs as a ras, and let's take the time about to pass. The Richelieu Rapids will be, until the mid-19th century, an important obstacle to navigation on the river. Summer 1633, after having taken possession of Quebec, occupied for three years by the English merchants, Champlain saw the possibility of creating new institutions in the colony. And it is precisely on the island, in the middle of the Rapids to which he gave the name of Richelieu, he installed the first post above Quebec. Very quickly, the Americans will come to Exchange furs. Champlain will fortify this place, because it allows to control passage on the river where circulate Iroquois Marauders

THE SEIGNEURIES

The seigneuries and Grondines Deschambault were granted at the same time by the company of the so-called Nouvelle-France Compagny des Cent-Associés. Map of Gedeon de Catalogne (part) in 1709 by Jean-Baptiste Decoüagne. In 1637, the Duchess of Aiguillon gets the promise a seigneurie to be granted to the nuns of the Hôtel-Dieu de Québec. This is fr. Jerome Lallemant, who will act on behalf of the nuns at the taking of possession of the seigneury "Of Grondines", signed in 1646 by Charles Huault de Montmagny, Governor and lieutenant General to the King of France. In 1672, the seigneury was enlarged eastward for the poor. The first confirmation will be celebrated by none other than Monseigneur de Laval in 1676. François de Chavigny, sieur de Berchereau, and bridesmaid Eléonore de Grandmaison, his widow wife Antoine Bourdier, are granted in 1640 a grant of a League and a half of land wide to take along the St. Lawrence River on three of depth. Their choice will stop on the land today in the east part of Deschambault. After the death of Mr de Chavigny in 1651, Éléonore de Grandmaison married Jacques de Gourdeau, sieur de Beaulieu, then after the latter's death, Jacques Cailhaut of the Tesserie de Lachevrotière. It is that, after the death of Mr de Lachevrotière it gets, in 1672, the enclaved land grant between the lordship of the poor of the Quebec hospital and the fief of Chandu.

ANCHORED IN HISTORY NAMES

The name Grondines is very old. It appears on a map of 1632. In 1712, in his report on the seigneuries, Gedeon de Catalogne explain this name by the "large number of flats of large pebbles which are escape, what makes that when it is windy, the waters are loud. For its part, Deschambault is named for Jacques - Alexis D'eschambault Fleury (1642-1715), husband of Marguerite de Chavigny. She was the daughter of François de Chavigny and Éléonore de Grandmaison, those who had obtained a concession in 1640.

BORN IN THE COUNTRY BUILDERS

The first settlers of Deschambault and Grondines come from families already established in Nouvelle-France, on the coast of Beaupré and the île Orleans. Although the land is granted in the middle of the 17th century, few of them will come to live permanently before 1670, because until then, the political climate favors little colonization; the Iroquois armed by the Dutch of Fort Orange (Albany, N.Y.) is too much threat. Josson, Hamelin, Masson, Leduc, Couillard, Tousignant, Mailhot, SaintAmant, Hudde, Chastenay, Salim will chose Grondines ; Arcand, Naud, Mayrand, Cloutier, Gauthier, Gariépy will move to La Chevrotière ; the Perost, Paquin, Groleau, Abel said Benoit and Montambault will be at Deschambault. In 1709, the engineer Gedeon de Catalogne are 35 families in Grondines, 22 La Chevrotière and 18 at Deschambault. In 1762, the three seigneuries are 663 souls.

A TERRITORY ORGANIZED

"The first occupation of the soil in Nouvelle-France was done by the intermediary of a territorial unit, a kind of neighborhood unit, which was called the coast and subsequently rank. Initially, the eastern waterfront and means arranged censives alignments perpendicular or almost to the shores of streams. When the banks were occupied, a second alignment was repeated behind the first, connected to it by a road called rise. A third, a fourth, a fifth alignment could follow in this order. […] This medium will be so organized physically by the parcel of row, socially by the parish and administratively the seigneury. »4 The administrative unit, now recognized as the municipality of Deschambault-Grondines comprises the first three rows of four Lordships, namely those of the nuns of the Hôtel-Dieu, the poor and La Chevrotière Chandu or Deschambault. Two parishes come together the inhabitants: Saint-Charles-des-Roches or Grondines, which registers were opened in 1680, and Saint-Josephde-Deschambault, whose records have been opened in 1713. If the parish today returns to the territory associated with the management of a Council, the fact remains that the Organization of the physical environment retains all traces of this pole whose center the Church and its bell towers. The administrative unit, now recognized as the municipality of Deschambault-Grondines comprises the first three rows of four Lordships, namely those of the nuns of the Hôtel-Dieu, the poor and La Chevrotière Chandu or Deschambault. Two parishes come together the inhabitants: Saint-Charles-des-Roches or Grondines, which registers were opened in 1680, and Saint-Joseph-de-Deschambault, whose records have been opened in 1713. If the parish today returns to the territory associated with the management of a Council, he fact remains that the Organization of the physical environment retains all traces of this pole whose center the Church and its bell towers.

A RICH RELIGIOUS HERITAGE

Religious heritage is ranked first among the witnesses of the establishment and rooting of Deschambault and Grondines communities. The legacy of the Catholic tradition is certainly concretely visible (churches, rectories, cemeteries, monasteries, cross road and wayside crosses), but it is also expressed through phenomena that are related to the intangible heritage. In this regard, efforts are being made for the transmission of certain traditions as midnight mass, sacred music and Gregorian chants. Religious communities devoted to education contributed greatly, not only in the education of children, but also to the cultural life of the villages with regard to literature, music, dramas, drawing and painting. The Sisters of charity of Quebec maintained their activities in Deschambault from 1861 to 1994 and the nuns of the Saint-Cœur-de-Marie to Grondines from 1944 to 1966. Religious heritage is ranked first among the witnesses of the establishment and rooting of Deschambault and Grondines communities. The legacy of the Catholic tradition is certainly concretely visible (churches, rectories, cemeteries, monasteries, cross road and wayside crosses), but it is also expressed through phenomena that are related to the intangible heritage. In this regard, efforts are being made for the transmission of certain traditions as midnight mass, sacred music and Gregorian chant. Religious communities devoted to education contributed greatly, not only in the education of children, but also to the cultural life of the villages with regard to literature, music, drama, drawing and painting. The Sisters of charity of Quebec maintained their activities in Deschambault from 1861 to 1994 and the nuns of the Saint-Cœur-de-Marie to Grondines from 1944 to 1966.

AN ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE RECOGNIZED

«In Portneuf, an air of family characterized architecture. Houses - including some of the oldest in Quebec - are made of limestone, a material abundant in the basement of this region, including Saint-Marc-des-Carrières and Neuville. Found at Deschambault, Cap-Santé and Neuville of many buildings of the 17th and 18th centuries on the walls mounted stone roughly squared, capped with sloping roofs, massed around very old places of Church, or arranged along the Chemin du Roy. These sets are unique. » 5 The recognition gained from the movement of backup and enhancement of heritage that still persist since the end of the 1980’s has tangible effects in the municipality: ten buildings are classified under the cultural property of the Quebec Act; protection areas attached to some of these buildings were allowed to maintain a consistency in the development of the territory; the Council of monuments and sites of Quebec adopted in 1982, a Charter of Quebec heritage conservation named Declaration of Deschambault; the municipality is part of the Association of the most beautiful villages of Quebec since the Foundation of this grouping in 1997; the older homes of Deschambault-Grondines are buyers passionate about heritage conservation each year, which contributes to the recognition of the municipality both for its architectural qualities as for the quality of life it offers its citizens.

1. Camille Lapointe, "Archaeology portneuvoise", continuity, summer 1991.

2. Camille Lapointe, "Archaeology portneuvoise", continuity, summer 1991.

3. Deschambault on over time, Editions VA Bene, 2002.

4. Jean-Claude Marsan, Habitat, architecture and culture in Quebec, encyclopedia of the Agora.

5. Yves Laframboise, picturesque Villages of Quebec, editions of man, 1996 June 2016 

You have more information and images in PDF format

Capsule # 0-M (10 pages) Format PDF: - Deschambault 

The capsules # 00 are information bearing the word Matte, the capsules # 0 are of general information used to complete the capsules identified # -1 (Charles) or # 1 (Nicolas and Madeleine) or # .2 (children) , etc., which correspond to lineages of Matte ancestors.

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Unfold Close A.Our First Ancestors

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