Historical Research - B.Places of Memory

B.Places of Memory

Capsule # 0-D -The Censuses of 1666 & 1681  -  by claudematte|ALL

Note: This document refers primarily to volume IV, chapter IV of the book HISTORY OF CANADIANS - FRENCH of Benjamin Sulte, edition 1977.
I assumes no liability for its accuracy. I would appreciate receiving any report of error at address: senecal@fmed.ulaval.ca

 I thank Cyril Cambien, for the use of its character recognition (OCR) software that he wants to share with the community.  Can download it at its page: http://persoweb.francenet.fr/~cambien                Jean-Guy Sanderson (speak Laframboise)

                                     Census 1666 & 1681

The first census in North America

Talon began his work as an administrator in making an inventory of the colony. He, in doing so, made a systematic census of the population in  during February & March 1666..

Talon conducted his census according to the principle of jure, i.e. that it counted the people at their usual place of residence. He also took himself a lot of counts, ranging from door to door. He scored all the inhabitants of the colony, indicating their name, their age, their profession, their marital status and their relationship to the head of the family in which they lived. This census also sought to assess the wealth industrial and agricultural colony, the value of forest and mineral resources, local as well as the number of domestic animals, seigneuries, government buildings and churches.

The Census allowed counted 3 215 inhabitants of European ancestry, or 2 034 men and 1 181 women. Among these inhabitants, there were 3 notaries, 3 teachers, 3 locksmiths, 4 bailiffs, 5 surgeons, 5 bakers, 8 manufacturers of tons, 9 Millers, 18 merchants, 27 joiners and 36 carpenters. The colony consisted mainly of three settlements, inhabited by 528 families. Quebec had a population of over 2 100 people, while Montréal had 635 inhabitants and Trois-Rivières, 455

GENERAL STATEMENT OF THE INHABITANTS OF CANADA IN 1666

Names and nicknames, ages, qualifications and occupations of all persons who are in the upper and lower town of Québec, including the Grande Allée

(for purposes of ease, only the section where appears Nicolas Matte has been reproduced, page 110).

NOTRE-DAME-DES-ANGES, THE RIVER SAINT-CHARLES ET CHARLESBOURG

Servants of the RR. PP. Jesuits of so-called places: Etienne Chaleu, 13, Joseph-Mathurin Renaut, 20, Mathurin Hardy, 40, Antoine Caron, 50, Antoine Jouve, 22, Vital Oriot, 18, Simon Caron, 16, and Jean Lavallée, 13, domestic; Claude Haumart, 22, tailor, domestic; Jacques Bédard, 45, roofing slate, domestic; Vincent Cloutier, domestic Shoemaker, 25,

Pascal Lemaistre, 45, tailor clothes, living; Louise Duval, 26, his wife; Geneviève, 4; Marie, 3; John, 18 months; Jacques Renaut, 18, committed domestic.

Pierre Coirier, 23, living; Anne Brunet, 20, his wife.

Mathurin Roy, 56, bricklayer, living; Margaret Bire, 50, his wife; Marie, 6; Jean Segouin, 20, Shoemaker, committed domestic.

Isaac Bedart, 50, Carpenter, capita; Marie Girard, 42, his wife; James, 20, charpentrier; Louis 10; Marie, 18 months.

Jean Ronseray, 23, living; Jeanne Servignau, 22, his wife.

Charles Grottreau, 25, living; Françoise Cousin, 26, his wife.

Adrien Michelon, 22, living; Geneviève Laurent, 24, his wife.

Philippe Maton, 31, living; Marguerite Doussinet, 23. his wife; Jeanne, 2; MarieMagdelaine, 6 months.

Jacques Duaut, 31, living; Marie Lemoyne, 20, his wife.

Jacques Galarneau, 24, living; Jacqueline Féron, 21, his wife.

John Normand, 28 Carpenter, living; Anne Laboureur, 36, his wife; Marie, 8; John, 5; Charles, 4; Jacques, 2; JacquesFrancois, 6 months.

Julien Gamin, 30, tailor clothes, living; Marie Ripoche, 29, his wife; Etienne, 9 months.

Jacques Regnaut, 31, living; Marie Cherrier, 27, his wife.

Gilles Enard, 30, living; Marie Debure, 18, his wife.

Jean Lemercher, 38 capita, Carpenter; Catherine Hurault, 26, his wife: Marguerite, 8; Marie, 4; Jean, 14 months; Nicolas Ragueneau, 20, committed domestic.

Pierre Vivier, 28, living; Marguerite Roy, 15, his wife.

Pierre Gaudin says Chatillon, 34, capita, Carpenter; Jeanne Roussillet, 30, his wife; Laurent, 11; Mary, 9, Catherine, 7; Gabriel, 5; Marie-Magdelaine, 1.

Paul Chalifou, 48, Carpenter, capita; Jacquette Archambaut, 34, his wife; Jeanne, 12; Simone, 10; Françoise, 8; Jeanne, 6; Louise, 5; Paul, 3; Mary, 10 months; Jacques Baudouin, 25, domestic commitment.

Thomas Touchet, 40, Carpenter, capita; Suzanne Ferrier, 48, his wife; Simon. 10; René Regnaut, 22, an apprentice Carpenter.

Pierre Sicateau, 40, living; Gabrielle Routtée, 56, his wife.

Pierre Picher, 30, Hatter, living; Catherine Durant, 27, his wife.

Samuel Vignier, 39, living; Anne Renault, 30, his wife; Marie, 10. Pierre Chamare, 27, Pastry-Cook, living; Florimonde table, 22, his wife. André Coudret, 23, living; Jeanne Bourgeois, 22, his wife.

Names and nicknames of residents and volunteers not married, are married in Fiance, residing in such places: Jean Jouy, 45, and Nicolas Matte, 26, capita; René Bruneau, 22, Weaver in canvas, living; Jean Tiberge, 25, Carpenter, resident, married in France; Courteous Bertrand, 21, living; Jean Lausonne, 24, voluntary; Etienne Pasquier, 45, gardener, voluntary; Philippe Guyon, 34, voluntary; Antoine Chevassu, 30, voluntary; Simon Chevreux, 30, living; Guillaume Picquefeu, 28, a resident, married in France; Pierre Corroye, 25, Shoemaker, voluntary; Etienne Leroy, 23, bricklayer, living; Charles Roullain, 30, voluntary; Louis Lormier, 30, a resident, married in France; Jacques Hudet, 29, living

The Census of 1681

 After the Talon Census of 1667, it took until 1681for Jacques Duchesneau, Talon’s replacement, to conduct the 5th and final census in 681 before we obtained new information for different places in New France and especially for Quebec City.

Already 15 years after Talon’s 1666 census, the colony’s workforce had tripled from 3215 to 9677. This spectacular growth of the New France provides a comparison of the 1681 data with those of the time of Jean Talon. Indeed, another phenomenon is added since then, demographic sprawl on the territory of the colony. Quebec City benefits from this growth since, during these 15 years, the number of its inhabitants went from 547 to 1345, showing a growth rate slightly lower than the rest of the colony for a population increase of nearby places. .

Jean Talon’s work in 1666 was compared to every day life in Quebec City in 1681. The results point to the demographic improvements of the imbalance between men and women. In 1666, the ratio was three males to one female in the population aged 15 and older in Quebec City, By 1681, the ratio is now less than two males per female while the percentage of men resident in Quebec City is just above the 60% (61.2%). Another impact of the coming of the King's daughters is related to the proportion of the population of Quebec City of less than 15 years. It was barely above 30% in 1666, and almost reached 40% in 1681. The impact of the changed demographics also resulted in lowering the median age of the population of Quebec, which was around 22 and a half years in 1667 to approximately 19 years in 1681.

Capsule # 0-D  (8 Pages)  Format PDF  - Censuses of 1666 & 1681

The capsules # 00 are information bearing the word Matte, the capsules # 0 are of general information used to complete the capsules identified # 0 (Charles) or # 1 (Nicolas and Madeleine) or # .2 (children) , etc., which correspond to lineages of Matte ancestors.

Note: This document refers primarily to volume IV, chapter IV of the book HISTORY OF CANADIANS - FRENCH of Benjamin Sulte, edition 1977.
I assumes no liability for its accuracy. I would appreciate receiving any report of error at address: senecal@fmed.ulaval.ca

 I thank Cyril Cambien, for the use of its character recognition (OCR) software that he wants to share with the community.  Can download it at its page: http://persoweb.francenet.fr/~cambien                Jean-Guy Sanderson (speak Laframboise)

                                     Census 1666 & 1681

The first census in North America

Talon began his work as an administrator in making an inventory of the colony. He, in doing so, made a systematic census of the population in  during February & March 1666..

Talon conducted his census according to the principle of jure, i.e. that it counted the people at their usual place of residence. He also took himself a lot of counts, ranging from door to door. He scored all the inhabitants of the colony, indicating their name, their age, their profession, their marital status and their relationship to the head of the family in which they lived. This census also sought to assess the wealth industrial and agricultural colony, the value of forest and mineral resources, local as well as the number of domestic animals, seigneuries, government buildings and churches.

The Census allowed counted 3 215 inhabitants of European ancestry, or 2 034 men and 1 181 women. Among these inhabitants, there were 3 notaries, 3 teachers, 3 locksmiths, 4 bailiffs, 5 surgeons, 5 bakers, 8 manufacturers of tons, 9 Millers, 18 merchants, 27 joiners and 36 carpenters. The colony consisted mainly of three settlements, inhabited by 528 families. Quebec had a population of over 2 100 people, while Montréal had 635 inhabitants and Trois-Rivières, 455

GENERAL STATEMENT OF THE INHABITANTS OF CANADA IN 1666

Names and nicknames, ages, qualifications and occupations of all persons who are in the upper and lower town of Québec, including the Grande Allée

(for purposes of ease, only the section where appears Nicolas Matte has been reproduced, page 110).

NOTRE-DAME-DES-ANGES, THE RIVER SAINT-CHARLES ET CHARLESBOURG

Servants of the RR. PP. Jesuits of so-called places: Etienne Chaleu, 13, Joseph-Mathurin Renaut, 20, Mathurin Hardy, 40, Antoine Caron, 50, Antoine Jouve, 22, Vital Oriot, 18, Simon Caron, 16, and Jean Lavallée, 13, domestic; Claude Haumart, 22, tailor, domestic; Jacques Bédard, 45, roofing slate, domestic; Vincent Cloutier, domestic Shoemaker, 25,

Pascal Lemaistre, 45, tailor clothes, living; Louise Duval, 26, his wife; Geneviève, 4; Marie, 3; John, 18 months; Jacques Renaut, 18, committed domestic.

Pierre Coirier, 23, living; Anne Brunet, 20, his wife.

Mathurin Roy, 56, bricklayer, living; Margaret Bire, 50, his wife; Marie, 6; Jean Segouin, 20, Shoemaker, committed domestic.

Isaac Bedart, 50, Carpenter, capita; Marie Girard, 42, his wife; James, 20, charpentrier; Louis 10; Marie, 18 months.

Jean Ronseray, 23, living; Jeanne Servignau, 22, his wife.

Charles Grottreau, 25, living; Françoise Cousin, 26, his wife.

Adrien Michelon, 22, living; Geneviève Laurent, 24, his wife.

Philippe Maton, 31, living; Marguerite Doussinet, 23. his wife; Jeanne, 2; MarieMagdelaine, 6 months.

Jacques Duaut, 31, living; Marie Lemoyne, 20, his wife.

Jacques Galarneau, 24, living; Jacqueline Féron, 21, his wife.

John Normand, 28 Carpenter, living; Anne Laboureur, 36, his wife; Marie, 8; John, 5; Charles, 4; Jacques, 2; JacquesFrancois, 6 months.

Julien Gamin, 30, tailor clothes, living; Marie Ripoche, 29, his wife; Etienne, 9 months.

Jacques Regnaut, 31, living; Marie Cherrier, 27, his wife.

Gilles Enard, 30, living; Marie Debure, 18, his wife.

Jean Lemercher, 38 capita, Carpenter; Catherine Hurault, 26, his wife: Marguerite, 8; Marie, 4; Jean, 14 months; Nicolas Ragueneau, 20, committed domestic.

Pierre Vivier, 28, living; Marguerite Roy, 15, his wife.

Pierre Gaudin says Chatillon, 34, capita, Carpenter; Jeanne Roussillet, 30, his wife; Laurent, 11; Mary, 9, Catherine, 7; Gabriel, 5; Marie-Magdelaine, 1.

Paul Chalifou, 48, Carpenter, capita; Jacquette Archambaut, 34, his wife; Jeanne, 12; Simone, 10; Françoise, 8; Jeanne, 6; Louise, 5; Paul, 3; Mary, 10 months; Jacques Baudouin, 25, domestic commitment.

Thomas Touchet, 40, Carpenter, capita; Suzanne Ferrier, 48, his wife; Simon. 10; René Regnaut, 22, an apprentice Carpenter.

Pierre Sicateau, 40, living; Gabrielle Routtée, 56, his wife.

Pierre Picher, 30, Hatter, living; Catherine Durant, 27, his wife.

Samuel Vignier, 39, living; Anne Renault, 30, his wife; Marie, 10. Pierre Chamare, 27, Pastry-Cook, living; Florimonde table, 22, his wife. André Coudret, 23, living; Jeanne Bourgeois, 22, his wife.

Names and nicknames of residents and volunteers not married, are married in Fiance, residing in such places: Jean Jouy, 45, and Nicolas Matte, 26, capita; René Bruneau, 22, Weaver in canvas, living; Jean Tiberge, 25, Carpenter, resident, married in France; Courteous Bertrand, 21, living; Jean Lausonne, 24, voluntary; Etienne Pasquier, 45, gardener, voluntary; Philippe Guyon, 34, voluntary; Antoine Chevassu, 30, voluntary; Simon Chevreux, 30, living; Guillaume Picquefeu, 28, a resident, married in France; Pierre Corroye, 25, Shoemaker, voluntary; Etienne Leroy, 23, bricklayer, living; Charles Roullain, 30, voluntary; Louis Lormier, 30, a resident, married in France; Jacques Hudet, 29, living

The Census of 1681

 After the Talon Census of 1667, it took until 1681for Jacques Duchesneau, Talon’s replacement, to conduct the 5th and final census in 681 before we obtained new information for different places in New France and especially for Quebec City.

Already 15 years after Talon’s 1666 census, the colony’s workforce had tripled from 3215 to 9677. This spectacular growth of the New France provides a comparison of the 1681 data with those of the time of Jean Talon. Indeed, another phenomenon is added since then, demographic sprawl on the territory of the colony. Quebec City benefits from this growth since, during these 15 years, the number of its inhabitants went from 547 to 1345, showing a growth rate slightly lower than the rest of the colony for a population increase of nearby places. .

Jean Talon’s work in 1666 was compared to every day life in Quebec City in 1681. The results point to the demographic improvements of the imbalance between men and women. In 1666, the ratio was three males to one female in the population aged 15 and older in Quebec City, By 1681, the ratio is now less than two males per female while the percentage of men resident in Quebec City is just above the 60% (61.2%). Another impact of the coming of the King's daughters is related to the proportion of the population of Quebec City of less than 15 years. It was barely above 30% in 1666, and almost reached 40% in 1681. The impact of the changed demographics also resulted in lowering the median age of the population of Quebec, which was around 22 and a half years in 1667 to approximately 19 years in 1681.

Capsule # 0-D  (8 Pages)  Format PDF  - Censuses of 1666 & 1681

The capsules # 00 are information bearing the word Matte, the capsules # 0 are of general information used to complete the capsules identified # 0 (Charles) or # 1 (Nicolas and Madeleine) or # .2 (children) , etc., which correspond to lineages of Matte ancestors.

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